Matt & T.J | Married | Kamloops

Matt and Teresa were married at McQueen Lake near Kamloops. For two of the most technological and plugged in people I have ever met, their blend of country charm and geek-culture made for a wedding day in which I spent more time laughing and trying to find every sci-fi / fantasy reference than taking photos. Surrounded by friends and family their wedding was an example of how weddings should be, with smiles, laughter and love creating an event that will not soon be forgotten by anyone there.
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As for the wine: “The choice of Jem’Hadar and Photographers everywhere!”
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Congratulations you two. And to fit the theme, a quote from Middle Earth:
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“When Winter comes, the winter wild that hill and wood shall slay; When trees shall fall and starless night devour the sunless day; When wind is in the deadly East, then in the bitter rain; I’ll look for thee, and call to thee; I’ll come to thee again!”
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Photographers: Andrew Snucins / Stacey Krolow
Hair / Makeup: Ra Hair Studio http://www.rahairstudio.com
Catering: Hop n’ Hog http://www.hopnhog.ca

 

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Luke & Erika | Married | Saanich, BC

As you grow older you look at people differently. The qualities that you admire and respect change. And so it’s with that in mind that this blog post description is a bit different than the norm. I remember standing in the wheat field at the end of the day, fourteen plus hours of shooting under our belts, and with golden sun painting the grass in rippling waves you could faintly smell the ocean on the wind, and the birds wheeling overhead broke the evenings sky with cries of joy. My second shooter Chris and I stood there in companionable silence for a time, satisfied in a days work. The silence ended when I noticed the groom and bride walking out of the reception area to continue thanking guests. I leaned towards Chris and said “They are quite the couple aren’t they” Chris nodded and smiled. This simple line could mean a few things,  that they were a good couple to work for, or perhaps, they were overall, a great pair of people. But I said that line with more in mind as I looked at Luke, his hands constantly moving to shake hands, pat shoulders, give re-assuring hugs, or pick up anything that needed moving, offering to help with everything despite it being his wedding day.
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The sentence was said with the realization that Luke is the kind of man that other men admire. The kind of person you would want your son to grow up to be, or the type you’d hope your daughter to marry. Then watching Erika, her laughter mirroring the cries of the birds overhead in its joy, the realization that she is the type of person anyone would want to be friends with. An anchor in the centre of Luke’s whirlwind her analytical mind was balanced by a passion that was noticeable the moment you walked into a room.
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I mentioned these points to Chris and with a rueful chuckle he started to make his way back to the reception to set up for the first dance photos. Calling over his shoulder he said “You coming Andrew?” and I realized I had stood there for some time, watching the type of people that surrounded Luke and Erika at their wedding, and with a bit of bemusement understanding that these qualities were not unique to them, but qualities their families and friends shared. An incredible group of people on a day straight out of a fairytale.
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And as I waved to Chris to walk on without me, I checked my camera straps and batteries as I have countless times before, and with a glance towards the sun as the last rays of light disappeared over the horizon I made my way back towards the sounds of laughter.

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Thank you Luke and Erika, for allowing us to be a part of such an incredible day.
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Photography: Andrew Snucins / Christian Tisdale
Hair: Tash Chooi: TLC Hair Studio
Makeup: Jenna Tackaberry
Flowers: Kenmar Flower Farms
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Helgi & Brittany | Married | Reykjavik, Iceland

The land of Fire and Ice. A place where the people and culture are as essential to the landscape as the moss in the high mountains, and tall grasses of the plains. The birthplace of myth and legend the beauty of Iceland welcomed its son Helgi Runar Olgeirsson and his soon to be bride Brittany Bechtel home with open arms. For one it was a homecoming. For the other, a welcome to a family that extends from sea to sea across the rugged landscape.
We spent a day touring the waterfalls for some ‘engagement’ photos in handcrafted Icelandic wool sweaters. This was followed by one of the most incredible weddings I have ever been a part of. Helgi’s family welcomed Will and I with the familiarity of long lost sons, and from the moment we stepped off our planes, Will from the UK and myself from Canada, we felt as if we too were home. The people of Iceland have that effect on you.
Now, less than a week later, as I stand on a hillside in western Canada, watching the sunset, I think back to the winds of Iceland. The smell of the ocean mingling with the heady scent of loam and earth. I think back to sitting in humbled silence as an entire wedding stood and sung Icelandic songs during the reception, guests from over seven countries uniting in a shared love of Helgi and Brittany.
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Thank you Helgi and Brittany. For the experience of a lifetime in a land lost to time.
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Í landi elds og ísa býr þjóð, þjóð samofin sinni menningu og landslagi eins og mosinn í hrauninu og grasbreiður dalanna. Þetta mikilfenglega land goðsagna bauð velkomin heim son sinn Helga Rúnar Olgeirsson og hans verðandi brúði, Brittany Bechtel. Ekki var einungis um heimkomu að ræða, heldur einnig þing þar sem tvær fjölskyldur, sem undir venjulegum kringumstæðum eru aðskildar, með haf á milli, runnu í eitt.
Við eyddum einum degi á ferð um landið, tókum svokallaðar trúlofunarmyndir þar sem eins litar lopapeysur léku lykilhlutverk. Á eftir kom eitt stórkostlegasta brúðkaup sem ég hef nokkurn tíman tekið þátt í. Fjölskylda Helga tók vel á móti mér og Will líkt og um sína eigin syni væri að ræða, og frá fyrstu skrefum okkar frá flugvellinum þótti okkur, Will frá Bretlandi og mér frá Kanada, eins og við værum komnir heim, gestrisni Íslendinga hefur þessi stórkostlegu áhrif.
Nú ekki nema viku seinna, er ég stend í ónefndri hlíð í vestur Kanada og horfi á sólarlagið er mér hugsað aftur til vinda Íslands, hafgolunnar og kynna minna við landið. Ég mynnist þess að hafa setið hljóður er brúðkaupsgestir sungu með í þekktum Íslenskum lögum þar sem gestir frá fjölda landa komu saman til að deila þeirri ást sem ríkir milli Helga og Brittany.
Takk fyrir Helgi og Brittany, fyrir einstaka upplifun í landi í tíma tíndu.

 

 

 

 

 

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Hagerty Fall Classic 2015 | Oregon – Washington

There is something different about the classiccaradventures events. It’s difficult to put into words. One moment from an event five or six years ago has always stuck with me. At the end of a Saturdays leg of the drive a  driver with a car worth close to half a million dollars was standing next to a young man with a car potentially worth five thousand. One of the drivers was in his late sixties, with decades of driving pedigree, and dozens of classics. The other standing next to his first classic.
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And both of them were smiling, laughing, and talking about the events of the day.They discussed the way their cars handled on the road, asking each other questions and sharing ideas for the next leg of the adventure. They talked about the joys of driving a classic. The shared experience of taking a piece of automotive history across thousands of kilometres of roads in all sorts of weather.
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They talked about giving into the urge that all drivers get when they see a road that catches their eye. That urge that pulls them around that next bend, or over the next crest.
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“I wonder where that road leads”

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It was an incredible moment to witness. And I realized it was just a microcosm of the larger Classic Car Adventures world. With people from all over North America uniting in the passion for great roads, great cars, and spending time with great people.
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This years Hagerty Fall Classic took us from mountain side to mountain side , and across the deserts and forests in-between. With drivers from the Canadian events meeting with our new friends from the Colorado Silver Summit it was a weekend of beautiful weather, amazing roads, and endless moments worthy of mention.
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This is just a small teaser gallery of images summing up the weekend. Drivers can contact me at asnucins@gmail.com to acquire photos, and full galleries will be posted within the next week.

 

 

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2015 Elk Hunt | Northern British Columbia

They say there is no more resounding sound than silence.

Or at least those prone to the poetic do.

This means different things in different parts of the world. In the heart of a city the noise mixes together so completely as to create a type of silence. A blend of smells and sounds that together form the constant motion that gives the city its life. Car horns and cross walk indicators, the steam from sewer vents and the mingled conversations of a thousand microcosm meetings as people pass each other on streets and in shops. The blend of noises is almost pleasant in its continuity, and for those that live in these places it becomes such a regular part of life as to go unnoticed for its uniqueness.

However, contrary to common thought the days in the valleys and mountainsides of the north are not as silent as expected. It is merely a different form of noise. The faint crack of deadfall timber settling to earth, the crunch of frost underfoot after a cold night, and the wind shaking leaves from the trees as summer sheds its clothing in preparation for winter.

And then, if you are fortunate enough, the bugle of a bull Elk will break the silence. It starts softly, building in intensity as your head swivels to try and find the source of the sound echoing across the valley. It ends with a roar, followed by the staccato grunts that are so indicative of the animal.

This sound is addictive, and when heard you can almost feel thousands of years of hunters turning their heads to the same sound at this time of year. The rut is close to beginning, and the bulls are journeying their solitary paths to find mates; offering challenge in the form of their cry to others that might cross their path.

These moments are why we hunt, the moments that connect us to our past and ourselves, generations of men and women following fathers and mothers into the wild places of the world to test themselves against millennia of evolution. Hunting has so very little to do with killing, and so much more to do with living.

That thought is hard to explain to those that do not find their peace in the quiet places. I lack the words to adequately express it.

This brings us back to silence. When we leave our cities and towns, we leave behind the noise and complexity of the city. We connect to a time when hunting was not just a pastime, but also a necessity. Connecting to a place that surrounds us with its own version of silence that can be deafening in its own right.

So I suppose, in retrospect, maybe there is no more resounding sound than that.

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